Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection cpt code

Chronic neck pain and cervical radicular pain are relatively common in the adult population. Treatment for chronic radicular pain recalcitrant to conservative management includes surgical management as well as interventional techniques with epidural injections utilizing either an interlaminar approach or transforaminal approach. Although there have been multiple systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials of cervical interlaminar epidural injections, the literature is sparse in reference to cervical transforaminal epidural injections. Overall, there is good evidence for the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections in managing cervical disc herniation and fair evidence in managing central spinal stenosis and postsurgery syndrome. The evidence is poor, however, for cervical transforaminal epidural injections. Complications with cervical interlaminar epidural injections are rare, but more commonly occur with transforaminal epidural injections and can be fatal. Emerging concepts in pain include further randomized trials; proper placebo design; focus on control design (either active control or placebo control); and appropriate methodologic quality assessment and evidence synthesis.

If you are using an old operating system, you may find that Google Chrome will allow you to visit modern websites without requiring an update to your operating system. Learn how to update your browser The ILIF Procedure (Interlaminar Lumbar Instrumented Fusion) was developed to overcome the potential shortcomings of standard lumbar spinal stenosis treatments (. decompression alone and decompression with fusion), using a minimally disruptive surgical technique. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a gradual narrowing of the space where nerves pass through the spine, which can be a result of aging and “wear and tear” on the spine from everyday activities and/or resultant positional changes of the vertebrae. The most common surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis is a procedure called a decompression, which involves removing bone or ligaments that are pressing on the spinal cord and/or nerves.
The ILIF procedure involves a minimally disruptive decompression procedure called a laminotomy, which involves temporary distraction (opening up) of the space between the spinous processes, and careful removal of only small sections of bone to release the pressure on the spinal cord and nerves.

The neck area (cervical) of your spine is made up of seven bones stacked on top of each other. The cervical discs are found in between each vertebra and act as a cushion to help the neck move and bend without affecting the surrounding nerves. If a cervical disc becomes diseased, the vertebrae might lose support and impact a nerve along the spine, thus resulting in pain and discomfort. During our cervical disc replacement procedure, we remove the diseased disc and replace it with an artificial disc to add cushion between the vertebrae and stabilize the spine.

In a retrospective study, Narozny and associates (2001) investigated the clinical effectiveness of nerve root blocks (., peri-radicular injection of bupivacaine and triamcinolone) for lumbar mono-radiculopathy in patients with a mild neurological deficit.  These researchers analyzed 30 patients (aged 29 to 82 years) with a minor sensory/motor deficit and an unequivocal MRI finding (20 disc herniations, 10 foraminal stenoses) treated with a SNRB.  Based on the clinical and imaging findings, surgery (decompression of the nerve root) was justifiable in all cases.  Twenty-six patients (87 %) had rapid (1 to 4 days) and substantial regression of pain, 5 required a repeat injection.  Furthermore, 60 % of the patients with disc herniation or foraminal stenosis had permanent resolution of pain, so that an operation was avoided over an average of 16 months (6 to 23 months) follow-up.  The authors concluded that SNRBs are very effective in the non-operative treatment of minor mono-radiculopathy and should be recommended as the initial treatment of choice for this condition.

Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection cpt code

cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection cpt code

In a retrospective study, Narozny and associates (2001) investigated the clinical effectiveness of nerve root blocks (., peri-radicular injection of bupivacaine and triamcinolone) for lumbar mono-radiculopathy in patients with a mild neurological deficit.  These researchers analyzed 30 patients (aged 29 to 82 years) with a minor sensory/motor deficit and an unequivocal MRI finding (20 disc herniations, 10 foraminal stenoses) treated with a SNRB.  Based on the clinical and imaging findings, surgery (decompression of the nerve root) was justifiable in all cases.  Twenty-six patients (87 %) had rapid (1 to 4 days) and substantial regression of pain, 5 required a repeat injection.  Furthermore, 60 % of the patients with disc herniation or foraminal stenosis had permanent resolution of pain, so that an operation was avoided over an average of 16 months (6 to 23 months) follow-up.  The authors concluded that SNRBs are very effective in the non-operative treatment of minor mono-radiculopathy and should be recommended as the initial treatment of choice for this condition.

Media:

cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection cpt codecervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection cpt codecervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection cpt codecervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection cpt codecervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection cpt code

http://buy-steroids.org