Effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on steroidogenesis in rat leydig cells

The European Union decided to ban the use of two classes of flame retardants, in particular, PBDEs and polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) in electric and electronic devices. This ban was formalised in the RoHS Directive, and an upper limit of 1 g/kg for the sum of PBBs and PBDEs was set. In February 2009, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements released two certified reference materials to help analytical laboratories better detect these two classes of flame retardants. The reference materials were custom-made to contain all relevant PBDEs and PBBs at levels close to the legal limit.

There are studies of cell cultures, laboratory animals, wildlife, and accidentally exposed humans that show that environmental chemicals cause a wide range of reproductive, developmental, growth, and behavior effects, and so while "endocrine disruption in humans by pollutant chemicals remains largely undemonstrated, the underlying science is sound and the potential for such effects is real." [37] While compounds that produce estrogenic, androgenic, antiandrogenic, and antithyroid actions have been studied, less is known about interactions with other hormones.

This website is provided in cooperation with the
Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS)

Some regular mattresses may have been treated with potentially toxic flame retardants called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which have been linked to learning, memory, and behavioral impairments, according to Lunder.

Though PBDEs were phased out of mattresses in 2005, they can still be found in other household items, including carpet padding and some electronics. The EWG advises opting for products that haven’t been treated with brominated fire retardants and choosing less-flammable materials, such as wool.

Effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on steroidogenesis in rat leydig cells

effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on steroidogenesis in rat leydig cells

Some regular mattresses may have been treated with potentially toxic flame retardants called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which have been linked to learning, memory, and behavioral impairments, according to Lunder.

Though PBDEs were phased out of mattresses in 2005, they can still be found in other household items, including carpet padding and some electronics. The EWG advises opting for products that haven’t been treated with brominated fire retardants and choosing less-flammable materials, such as wool.

Media:

effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on steroidogenesis in rat leydig cellseffects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on steroidogenesis in rat leydig cellseffects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on steroidogenesis in rat leydig cellseffects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on steroidogenesis in rat leydig cellseffects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on steroidogenesis in rat leydig cells

http://buy-steroids.org