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Ashkenazi et al (2010) stated that interventional procedures such as PNBs and trigger point injections (TPIs) have long been used in the treatment of various headache disorders.  There are, however, little data on their effectiveness for the treatment of specific headache syndromes.  Moreover, there is no widely accepted agreement among headache specialists as to the optimal technique of injection, type, and doses of the local anesthetics used, and injection regimens.  The role of corticosteroids in this setting is also being debated.  These investigators performed a PubMed search of the literature to find studies on PNBs and TPIs for the treatment of headaches.  They classified the abstracted studies based on the procedure performed and the treated condition.  These researchers found few controlled studies on the effectiveness of PNBs for headaches, and virtually none on the use of TPIs for this indication.  The most widely examined procedure in this setting was greater occipital nerve block, with the majority of studies being small and non-controlled.  The techniques, as well as the type and doses of local anesthetics used for PNBs, varied greatly among studies.  The specific conditions treated also varied, and included both primary (., migraine, cluster headache) and secondary (., cervicogenic, post-traumatic) headache disorders.  Trigeminal (., supraorbital) nerve blocks were used in few studies.  Results were generally positive, but should be taken with reservation given the methodological limitations of the available studies.  The procedures were generally well-tolerated.  The authors concluded that there is a need to perform more rigorous clinical trials to clarify the role of PNBs and TPIs in the management of various headache disorders, and to aim at standardizing the techniques used for the various procedures in this setting.

Critics say that because his work has focused on higher-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorders, his work requires independent replication with broader samples. [51] A Nature article published in 2011 says, "Some critics are also rankled by Baron-Cohen's history of headline-grabbing theories—particularly one that autism is an 'extreme male' brain state. They worry that his theory about technically minded parents may be giving the public wrong ideas, including the impression that autism is linked to being a 'geek'." [51]

It’s no secret there exist a strong anti-steroidal population and as this “anti” feeling is often so emotionally based it can produce some laughable claims. If you’ve been around the performance enhancing game for any length of time you’re familiar with all the names and acronyms so this will probably make you laugh. Yes, there are a few street names for steroids such as juice or roids but those are some very generic terms and really don’t point to anything specific. We went to a handful of the anti-steroid websites so desperate to paint anabolic hormones in a bad light and they have made up their own street names for steroids that are quite humorous and they include “Pumpers, Gym Candy, Arnolds, Stackers, Balls and Bulls, A’s, Weight Trainers.” “Weight Trainers” are you serious, Arnolds? If that didn’t make you laugh a little then you don’t have a sense of humor but the sad truth is these websites are real and many of them are funded by your government.

Eq steroid women

eq steroid women

It’s no secret there exist a strong anti-steroidal population and as this “anti” feeling is often so emotionally based it can produce some laughable claims. If you’ve been around the performance enhancing game for any length of time you’re familiar with all the names and acronyms so this will probably make you laugh. Yes, there are a few street names for steroids such as juice or roids but those are some very generic terms and really don’t point to anything specific. We went to a handful of the anti-steroid websites so desperate to paint anabolic hormones in a bad light and they have made up their own street names for steroids that are quite humorous and they include “Pumpers, Gym Candy, Arnolds, Stackers, Balls and Bulls, A’s, Weight Trainers.” “Weight Trainers” are you serious, Arnolds? If that didn’t make you laugh a little then you don’t have a sense of humor but the sad truth is these websites are real and many of them are funded by your government.

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