Skin thinning topical steroids

Cream:
-Common (1% to 10%): Application site pruritus, application site erythema
-Uncommon (% to 1%): Application site bleeding, application site discomfort, application site dryness, application site inflammation, application site irritation, application site paresthesia, application site reaction

Foam:
-Common (1% to 10%): Application site burning, application site reaction
-Frequency not reported: Application site reactions (dryness, erythema, irritation, paresthesia, pruritus, rash, warmth)

Gel:
-Common (1% to 10%): Application site burning
-Frequency not reported: Treatment-related application site reactions (dermatitis, discharge, dryness, erythema, irritation, pain, pruritus, pustules)
-Postmarketing reports: Burning sensation, pain, skin irritation, erythema

Shampoo:
-Uncommon (% to 1%): Application site erythema, application site irritation, application site pruritus, application site reaction
-Rare (% to %): Application site hypersensitivity, application site pustules

Some people have frequent flare-ups of eczema. For example, a flare-up may subside well with topical steroid therapy. But then, within a few weeks, a flare-up returns. In this situation, one option that might help is to apply steroid cream on the usual sites of flare-ups for two days every week. This is often called weekend therapy. This aims to prevent a flare-up from occurring. In the long run, it can mean that the total amount of topical steroid used is less than if each flare-up were treated as and when it occurred. You may wish to discuss this option with your doctor.

There is some evidence that sun exposure can accelerate steroid-induced skin atrophy, the development of which can be limited by protecting the skin, particularly the face and arms, from the sun.  Daily use of a broad-spectrum sunscreen (UVB and UVA block) and appropriate protective clothing is recommended. 10 , 12 - 14   Patients on corticosteroids should also be encouraged to regularly use moisturisers on their arms and legs, as these may reduce bruising and tearing of the skin from minor trauma. 11   Evidence suggests that topical tretinoin can increase the epidermal thickness of sun-damaged atrophic skin, but long-term use may be necessary. 14   In dermatological practice, topical retinoids are used to help reverse skin atrophy caused by sun exposure or corticosteroid use.

Skin thinning topical steroids

skin thinning topical steroids

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