Topical steroids eczema pregnancy

Dry, chapped, and itchy skin on the hands that doesn’t improve with moisturizer may be a sign of hand eczema. Symptoms can include red, itchy, inflamed skin with blistering that can lead to oozing, crusting, and cracking. People who have their hands in water all day or work closely with irritants such as detergents or solvents are more likely to develop this type of eczema. If you had atopic dermatitis as a child, you may also have a higher risk of developing hand eczema. Applying a cream after washing hands or wearing gloves may help protect hands from future flare-ups.

A common mistake is to be too cautious about topical steroids. Some parents undertreat their children's eczema because of an unfounded fear of topical steroids. They may not apply the steroid as often as prescribed, or at the strength needed to clear the flare-up. This may actually lead to using more steroid in the long term, as the inflamed skin may never completely clear. So, you may end up applying a topical steroid on and off (perhaps every few days) for quite some time. The child may be distressed or uncomfortable for this period if the inflammation does not clear properly. A flare-up is more likely to clear fully if topical steroids are used correctly.

Phototherapy or light treatment is an effective treatment for eczema. With phototherapy, various wavelengths of sunlight (UVB, UVA, combined UVA/UVB, UVA1, or narrow-band) are administered in a unit that is similar to a telephone booth but which is lined by fluorescent appearing light bulbs. The type of phototherapy that you will receive will be determined by your dermatologist. It is usually administered twice weekly. Possible side effects of phototherapy are redness, sunburn, or dryness. Long-term side effects, which are more likely with white skin, are possible skin cancers and enhanced aging.

Guidance on prescribing topical steroids reminds practitioners to prescribe the least strong steroid which is effective for the least possible length of time. A balance must be struck between efficacy and reducing adverse effects. Education is crucial to maximise efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Use of printed information may be helpful (including detail of how to use emollients and topical steroids) and education involving practice nurses to help improve efficacy of treatments and information for patients. Examples can be obtained from the British Association of Dermatologists and the National Eczema Society.

Topical steroids eczema pregnancy

topical steroids eczema pregnancy

Guidance on prescribing topical steroids reminds practitioners to prescribe the least strong steroid which is effective for the least possible length of time. A balance must be struck between efficacy and reducing adverse effects. Education is crucial to maximise efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Use of printed information may be helpful (including detail of how to use emollients and topical steroids) and education involving practice nurses to help improve efficacy of treatments and information for patients. Examples can be obtained from the British Association of Dermatologists and the National Eczema Society.

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